This 28 minute documentary-style safety video is the culmination of two years of filming. The content was collected by five individual boating sub chapters: The Pilot, The Paddlers, The Sailors, The Motor Boaters and Operation Clear Channel.

Along with Liberty Yacht Club’s Vice Commodore, Jim Chambers, the video seeks to tell the first-hand story of how to operate safely and how to work together as one tribe of mariners in the Port of New York and New Jersey.

The video originally appeared on thesafeboating.us website and was made using a grant from the State of NJ Dept of Transportation Maritime Division IBoatNJ Program. John Rako was the Executive Producer.

DON’T FORGET THIS IMPORTANT DOCUMENT!

Photo appeared in Tampa Bay Times

So, you have finally fulfilled your dream of having a boat!  Or, you have been crew on your friend’s boats for several years.  If you own a boat you have the vessel registered with the U. S. Coast Guard, a port of call has been secured, and the boat has been insured. You have a ships log, i.e. trips, repairs, and more recorded in a notebook of some kind.  You know what PHRF stands for, and have a copy of the U.S. Sailing Rules of Racing. But do you have a sailing/racing profile?

Read more

Dressing a Ship

During holidays, at regattas or on other special occasions, dressing a ship in brightly colored flags has been a long and fun tradition. Not only does it look festive, but it also pays homage to centuries of maritime history. The flags which are used for dressing ships are known as the International Code of Signal Flags, often called alphabet flags because each flag represents a particular letter or number.

Read more

Clipper Round the World Race

The Clipper Round the World Race was started in 1995 by Sir Robin Knox-Johnston who became the first person to sail single-handed non-stop around the world in 1969. Today, it is the longest sailing race totaling over 40,000 miles as it circumnavigates the globe across some of the world’s toughest oceans. The race is divided into eight legs with crews being able to race completely around the world, or on one leg or several. Based on the original tea clippers which ruled the oceans 150 years ago, the race starts in England, crosses the Atlantic Ocean to South America, heads eastward around the tip of Africa and eventually finishes back in England roughly a year later.

This week, the boats are back at Liberty Landing Marina and in North Cove in Manhattan. It’s a great opportunity to come down and see the boats and find out more about this epic race that is open to all.

Words and Phrases with a Nautical Heritage

The English language is a rich and varied language that developed over centuries, borrowing words and terms from other languages. England’s strong maritime culture also played a large role in shaping language, with many common terms being used today tracing their origins to Britain’s nautical history. For fun, we highlight some of those below: Read more